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Google Maps

The 'new' Google Maps (I'm writing this in 2014) isn't usually thought of as a spatial data browser, but it is. If you type or paste a lat/lon (WGS84 datum) into the search bar and press 'Enter', the spot location will appear as a placemark on the main image. In the screenshot below, the location is the Queen Victoria Museum's art gallery at Royal Park in Launceston.


Google Maps
 

You can enter a lat/lon in any of its usual formats. Google Maps will show the lat/lon in DMS format (see screenshot above) if DMS wasn't entered.

Because Google Maps accepts a lat/lon as a location, you can use Google Maps services like route planning and Street View from and to the entered lat/lon.

Even better, you can use Google Maps to pick a location on a map and find out its lat/lon. The trick is to right-click after placing the cursor over the location, then choose What's Here? from the right-click menu. In the screenshot below, the cursor is over the monument in Launceston's Royal Park:


Google Maps
 

After choosing What's Here?, a box under the search bar box shows the lat/lon of the location in decimal degrees:


Google Maps
 

Note that a lat/lon in decimal degrees to the nearest 0.000001 degree is wildly over-accurate. See the error page for details.

If you hover your mouse cursor over the lat/lon, it becomes a hyperlink. When clicked, the lat/lon in decimal degrees is shown in DMS format.


Google Maps
 

Google Maps